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Here’s the final installment of my top 31 horror films since the year 2000.

HAPPY HALLOWEEN!!!!

#1 Lovely Molly (2011)

Lovely Molly is by no means the best film on my list. It’s not the scariest. It’s not the coolest. It certainly isn’t the best technically. So why is it my number one? It’s really hard to pin down a reason except that I just connected with the pathos of the main character, Molly, as she’s repeatedly ravaged and fights to stay sane. It’s heartbreaking, and especially so because her attempts to remain strong and brave are so pitifully futile and there’s nothing I could do except watch her crumble before my eyes, to break beyond repair. This connection couldn’t be possible without the conviction of Gretchen Lodge, who gives absolutely everything to the role and goes places many actors wouldn’t dare. And it’s devastating.

Lovely Molly is made by Eduardo Sanchez, one of the two geniuses who made The Blair Witch Project. He’s made a few films since TBWP, which have been ok, but nothing as inspired as Lovely Molly. Sanchez reveals the plot slowly and methodically, teasing with elusive imagery, performance, and dialogue. It’s never obtuse or brazen, just so perfectly delicate that it almost works on a subconscious level – the brutal climax arrives with there’s nowhere else to really go, yet it never feels expected and is executed so cleverly that it still manages to knock you in the guts.

Please watch Lovely Molly. It deserves more eyes. Big budget snobbery robbed this from a wider audience, which is good in a way, because like so many on my list, it feels like its mine. But I do like to share. I just wish I was there with you to see you squirm.

Thanks for coming along this little journey with me, whoever you are – if you’re even there. It’s been a self-indulgent bit of fluffery, but all I hope is that you found something that you hadn’t seen before, and liked. And if you’re out there and there’s something you think I’d like, I’d love to hear from you and see what you got.
Thanks for playin’.

The complete list.
#31 The Damned (2014)
#30 A Serbian Film (2010)
#29 The Inside (2012)
#28 Calvaire (2004)/Inbred (2012)
#27 Frankenstein’s Army (2013)
#26 Thale (2012)
#25 Bridgend (2013)
#24 The Grey (2011)
#23 Across The River (2013)
#22 The Pact (2011)
#21 Rec (2007)
#20 Baskin (2016)
#19 Let the Right One In (2008)
#18 Resolution (2013)
#17 I Saw the Devil (2010)
#16 Spring (2014)
#15 The Host (2006)
#14 Monsters (2010)
#13 Rubber Johnny (2013)
#12 The Triangle (2016)
#11 Under the Skin (2013)
#10 Pieces of Talent (2014)
#9 Entrance (2011)
#8 Bone Tomahawk (2015)
#7 Trollhunter (2010)
#6 Wolf Creek (2005)
#5 Beyond the Black Rainbow (2010)
#4 The Witch (2016)
#3 Kill List (2011)
#2 Session 9 (2001)
#1 Lovely Molly (2011)

Mark Goodchild
Creative Director

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Here’s the next installment of my top 31 horror films since the year 2000.

#2 Session 9 (2001)

In keeping with the theme of losing one’s mind, Session 9 explores the idea that it only takes a push in the wrong direction, from the wrong stimuli, to shatter one’s reason and lose all sense of control.

Session 9 is a haunted house story, that tells the story of Gordon, played with such deft cadence by the always incredible Peter Mullan, who owns an asbestos abatement company in financial tatters and in order to stay in business, he underbids and over-promises to stake claim on the massive job of cleaning out an abandoned mental institution. He promises the job completed within days instead of weeks, stretching his crew very thin in order to finish the task, and in turn, they teeter on exhaustion and the unbearable pressures to finish on time. Working in the creepiest place on Earth also contributes to slow ebbing away at their sanity. The very foundations of life become monumental struggles, but is it the stress of their mammoth task that makes them unravel, or is it the ghosts of the broken souls who once resided in the hospital? Soon old records and files of the patients are uncovered giving insight into the cruelty and insanity of the patients, including nine taped sessions of a young girl with multiple personality disorder who murdered her parents on orders from one such personality, who reveals himself to the doctor recording the sessions on the ninth and final tape. As the tapes are played, one by one, the voices heard seem to echo not only down the expansive shadowy halls of the hospital but also in the heads of the workers.

It’s wonderfully gothic stuff, but without the romanticism. The acting is fantastic, especially by Mullan and, wait for it, David Caruso who is excellent as the voice of reason. But no doubt, the best performance is by the very real Danvers Lunatic Asylum, that actually stood abandoned and was used to set the film. The film’s cast and crew swore that the place was haunted and that it really messed with their heads while filming at night, giving the film a very unnerving vibe throughout. Session 9 is scary, smart horror that stays with you long after your stay.

Check out the trailer below and come back tomorrow for my number one pick!!!

Mark Goodchild
Creative Director

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Down to the piano wire kids. It’s been a fun, but challenging month. Some of my picks where somewhat interchangeable, but my final three are firm. And by further analysis of my full list, it’s clear that what scares me most is the failing mind and the horror that can come out of it. My top three are all films about the fragility of the human psyche and what can happen when the horrors, real or not, shatters dreams and treads on hope. Horror is real, as real as the mind allows. There’s nothing more terrifying than that.

#3 Kill List (2011)

With all the documentaries I’ve watched about soldiers and PTSD, war can ravage the mind and the ability to cope with the simplest things can become challenging at a minimum. Compound that with something really horrible and watch the mind break wide open.

Kill List is a story of a man, back from the Iraq where he served in a private security service, who attempts to keep the struggles with ‘normal life’ at bay. His marriage is complicated, his attempt at fatherhood is challenged by his own inability to grow up and accept responsibility. A nagging war wound hinders him from working so in order to provide, he and his best friend and war buddy accept a series of hits for a mysterious and discreet client. When they uncover that things aren’t as they seem, his sanity begins to unravel and it becomes impossible to contain the terrible realization that war-torn Iraq was probably the safest and most sane place on earth.

Kill List
is English auteur, Ben Wheatley’s first feature film and it’s astonishing. The level of authenticity is chilling and made all the more realistic through its journalistic handheld camera work that never shies away from the domestic battles or very, very brutal violence. This authenticity is reinforced by some of the best acting I’ve ever seen. Neil Maskell and MyAnna Buring star as Jay and Shel, the husband and wife trying to find order after the war. Their portrayal of marriage on the edge of collapse is breathtaking. But Michael Smiley steals the show. He’s fantastic as Gal, the best friend caught between saving Jay’s marriage, his sanity and his life. The actors are allowed to riff off each other and Wheatley lets them go as far as they need to. And they go far. It’s brilliant stuff.

Kill List is messed up and takes you into a darkness that you never saw yourself going. Like, Jay, your mind will suffer from the experience. At least we know things like this only exist in the movies. Right?

Check out the trailer below and come back tomorrow to see my #2.

Mark Goodchild
Creative Director

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Here’s the next installment of my top 31 horror films since the year 2000.

#4 The Witch: A New-England Folktale (2016)

The Witch is a masterpiece of filmmaking. Like The Exorcist, The Witch is shot and structured as a drama built around something supernatural. The conflict is allowed to seep in, to exist as it does in real life, lurking in plain view, anywhere, everywhere. The drama doesn’t revolve around a contrived horror concept, it comes out of the characters, their flaws, beliefs, hopes, and desires. I will concede that there are some legendary scares, but they are smart and are never superfluous, and again only serve to better support the larger theme of faith and the struggle to remain righteous in the face of temptation, which waits at almost every turn.

The Witch is a simple story about a 17th century family of pious pilgrims, who after settling from old-England to New-England, are faced with the seemingly insurmountable odds at remaining spiritually faithful in a new and hostile world. The witch could quite possibly be a narrative construct that these innocent fools believe is the cause of their misfortune, or she just might be very real. Doesn’t matter much, as the story is about this family’s losing battle against the many forms of pain and suffering that are right outside the door. We blame witches, aliens, terrorists, germs, or God, but whatever the law, there is a human temptation to break it, and as long as we are ignorant to the truth, we create all manner of manifestations to blame.

The Witch is such a bloody smart film. It preys on our subconscious. Director, Robert Eggers, is an absolute master at creating tone and tension and where most would go straight for the throat, he shows remarkable restraint to establish an anxious tone that eats away you with every growing minute – the long slug-slow zoom of the chopping block as the father angrily cuts wood, staying long enough to anticipate the axe falling short to slam into his shin, but instead cutting away to an extra long take on the warbled eye of Black Philip the goat, a crow pecking viciously at the atrophied breast of the mother who mourns the deaths of her children, the peek-a-boo game. It’s lush, precious stuff that really messes with your head.

Check out the trailer below and be sure to tune in tomorrow for #3.

Mark Goodchild
Creative Director

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Here’s the next installment of my top 31 horror films since the year 2000.

Well, only five to go! Let’s get to it.

#5 Beyond the Black Rainbow (2010)

I love introducing new movies to people (hence this list), partly, to entertain, partly is to educate, but mostly, I want people to share an experience in hope that they feel the same magic I did. And I’m so proud when I’ve found one that I think will blow people away. Well, I showed Beyond the Black Rainbow to a friend and his wife’s, eager to see their reactions at its awesomeness. Both absolutely hated it. So it’s safe to say this film is not going to be for everyone. You’re either going to love it or hate it. I absolutely love it.

The reason I rate BTBR so highly is due to its utterly bizarre aesthetic, like a student-made 80s sci-fi movie mixed with Twin Peaks mixed with John Carpenter. It borrows heavily from films like Assault on Precinct 13, THX1138, and Blade Runner, but with contemporary horror sensibilities. There’s a sense of Lynchian pastiche to the acting, long uncomfortable pauses in dialogue and dreamy soap opera melodrama, especially from Michael Rogers who is absolutely chilling as Psychologist Barry Nyle. But where Rogers is absurd, Eva Bourne is subdued and mystifying as a prisoner with special powers, Elena, being held against her will by Nyle.

But is BTBR horror? Yeah, but not in the traditional sense. The film is slow, very slow. It’s art cinema, like Jodorowsky films are. It asks a lot from its viewers. And the horror comes slow, molasses slow, but I appreciate that slow burn. To me, it builds tension and rising hot pressure, and when it finally blows, it goes Vesuvius. Weird turns to creepy. Creepy turns to frightening. It gets bloody, fast, and – oh, and did I mention creepy. So yeah, it’s horror, but not for everyone. Heck, it’s barely for anyone. But it is definitely for me. In spades.

Check out the trailer below and be sure to tune in tomorrow for #4.

The list so far.
#31 The Damned (2014)
#30 A Serbian Film (2010)
#29 The Inside (2012)
#28 Calvaire (2004)/Inbred (2012)
#27 Frankenstein’s Army (2013)
#26 Thale (2012)
#25 Bridgend (2013)
#24 The Grey (2011)
#23 Across The River (2013)
#22 The Pact (2011)
#21 Rec (2007)
#20 Baskin (2016)
#19 Let the Right One In (2008)
#18 Resolution (2013)
#17 I Saw the Devil (2010)
#16 Spring (2014)
#15 The Host (2006)
#14 Monsters (2010)
#13 Rubber Johnny (2013)
#12 The Triangle (2016)
#11 Under the Skin (2013)
#10 Pieces of Talent (2014)
#9 Entrance (2011)
#8 Bone Tomahawk (2015)
#7 Trollhunter (2010)
#6 Wolf Creek (2005)

Mark Goodchild
Creative Director

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Here’s the next installment of my top 31 horror films since 2000.

#6 Wolf Creek (2005)

If David from Pieces of Talent is the cutest serial killer ever, Wolf Creek’s Mick Taylor might be the nastiest. John Jarratt is marvelous in the role of a pig hunter who preys on anyone who wanders into his tiny chunk of the Australian Outback. Mick delights in toying with his victims and it’s hilarious at first, laughing in a chortling way that depending on its context, could seem hysterical one second and blood-curdling the next. He warms up his quarry with a rambling redneck shtick, masterfully creating a false sense of security and jovial affability, then without warning he instantly turns from jocular yokel to dead-eyed aggressor, brimming with latent violence, like a mean drunk, fuming with unpredictable menace. Then in a blink, he’s back to being a playful host. This is kid’s play until he gets bored, then he becomes something altogether evil.

The story sees three friends who decide to break from city life in Adelaide, South Australia, and travel westward into the desert on an excursion the Wolf Creek Crater, the site of a massive meteorite impact 300,000 years ago. After days of travel, they arrive at the crater, leave their car and hike for hours to the summit and back. Upon starting their car, the engine fails and they are stuck in the middle of nowhere until Mick shows up, as if by chance, right outta the blue. He convinces them it’s safer to stay at his homestead so he can help them come morning. What follows is a night of torture and terror, pain and sorrow as Mick barks his vulgarities and shows them first hand how he treats the pigs he hunts.

The scary thing is, supposedly this is all true and taken from the actual accounts of the sole survivor. A massive manhunt was carried out in search of ‘Mick Taylor’, but he, nor his slaughterhouse were ever found. Meaning that, if the story is true, the man with the laugh could still be out there somewhere. Well, I hadn’t planned on going to Oz anytime soon anyway.

Check out the trailer below and come back tomorrow for my #5.

Mark Goodchild
Creative Director

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Here’s the next installment of my top 31 horror films since 2000.

#7 Trollhunter (2010)

Trollhunter is another film from Norway, and like Thale, mythological beasts are again in the spotlight – literally. I know I bandy the word “cool” around this list a bunch, usually when words can’t describe the jubilation I feel toward something so unexpectedly and inexplicably above my expectations. There is a lot of cool films on this list, no doubt, but none are cooler than Trollhunter.

As a child I always feared trolls. I imagined them as horrendously ugly brutes that had a penchant for baby meat. I never imagined I’d ever see one, except in my nightmares. But while watching this film, it wasn’t too hard for me to imagine that what I was watching could actually be authentic.

Shot as a found footage film, a team of young students investigate weird animal disappearances that seem to be entangled in a conspiracy. They are lead to a gruff outdoors-man whom they follow into the woods one night, where they accidentally thwart his efforts to hunt and kill an assortment of actual troll species that have broken a centuries old agreement to never breach the government-imposed boundaries separating them from civilization. Surviving the night, the hunter agrees to allow them to film him while he stalks his massive prey. Usually found footage films are deliberately shaky and obscured by darkness because most are small budget and can’t afford a believable nemesis. Not Trollhunter. There’s clearly a budget here, teeny by Hollywood standards, and a lot of talented effects artists were able to create believable trolls that are captured with steady hands, in all their grotesque glory. I was so captivated and giddy at seeing my youthful nightmare fodder come to life. The cameras know we want to see these creatures and director André Øvredal is smart enough to let you observe them, as though you’re expecting a David Attenborough voice over. The trolls are exactly as I imagined, dumb, ugly, clumsy and really, really nasty.

I know this film might sounds ridiculous, but I promise you Trollhunter is clever and exciting enough that I would be amazed if even the most cynical viewer wasn’t touched by the efforts of the remarkable Trollhunter.

Check out the trailer below and come back tomorrow for my #6.

Mark Goodchild
Creative Director

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Here’s the next installment of my top 31 horror films since 2000.

#8 Bone Tomahawk (2015)

Bone Tomahawk was my favorite film of 2015. Not horror film. Film. Period. I think it’s a masterpiece of cross-genre storytelling. I love westerns, especially gritty, dirty, and mean ones. My favorite TV show ever is Deadwood, and Bone Tomahawk takes that show’s poetic-realism and fuses it with something crazy, like Predator, and does it full-bore, throwing all caution and reason to the wind. It’s audacious and brave, ugly and violent, tragic and funny. There are so many “holy bleep” moments, so many unexpected turns and unorthodox action, it’s a marvel to behold. So fun. So nasty. So cool.

Everybody just nails their roles and performs their guts out – literally. Kurt Russell, of course, is delightful as Sheriff Hunt, Patrick Wilson is great, but the best performances go to an almost unrecognizable Richard Jenkins as deputy Chicory and Matthew Fox, who after Lost wallowed in obscurity. He is dazzling here as the reformed but haunted Indian killer, Brooder. So few productions have an ensemble cast that manages to merge together as a unified mighty performance. This troupe is beautiful to watch and I wanted so much more of them when their journey ends and the credits roll.

The story is so nuts, but if you haven’t seen it yet, I’m not going spoil it for you here. Just trust me and watch it and prepare to be blown away. Bone Tomahawk is the closest thing to the perfect horror-western you’ll ever find. Magic, wicked stuff.

Check out the trailer below and be sure to tune in tomorrow for #7.

Mark Goodchild
Creative Director

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Here’s the next installment of my top 31 horror films since 2000.

#9 Entrance (2011)

You know that feeling that you have when you’re alone at night and you hear the floor creak or notice a shadow in the hall that you’ve never seen before; you sit in the dark, frozen, neck strained in the direction of the sound, eyes darting as though their aim will acutely pinpoint the origin of the noise and determine if it’s the pipes settling or perhaps something worse? It’s an undeniable feeling, and so much more scary than a sudden freight, because it festers. Well I’ve never before experienced a film that has made me feel that way while watching, never until Entrance.

Suzy is a newcomer to the big city, where its scale and isolation from thousands of strangers can make it the loneliest place in the world. She’s attractive and cool and by all appearances, she’s strong and independent until alone when the pressures strip away her armor and we see her vulnerability exposed when walking home at night, watching a scary movie, getting cat-called by a pack of dudes, even when intimate with a man. Her roommate is barely there, only a dog provides the illusion of safety. We are there as well. The HDVideo camera is never more than two feet away from her. When Suzy thinks she hears an unusual noise, so do we and we sit with her, neck strained for what seems like forever until the coast is clear. The camera’s deep focus leaves a lot of empty space that remains sharp and clear and seems intentionally composed by its operator, so we can spot the threat that seems to constantly be there, but brilliantly, never (well mostly never) materializes. All of this makes the tragic ending that much more ugly and wretched.

Entrance
is a brilliant little film and deserves a bigger audience. It’s smart, subversive and very unsettling. And makes you feel like crap for being a man.

Check out the trailer below and be sure to tune in tomorrow for #8.

Mark Goodchild
Creative Director

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Well you’ve made it to my top ten. While all of the films on the list so far are very dear to me, my top ten are special. There is something in each that astounded me and transcended my love for the genre to a renewed love for cinema, story and character. And they provide me an insight into the human mind – the scariest place of all. Most of my top ten are intricate pieces of artistic expression. They aren’t bombastic or even successful in a consumerist sort of way. Most are small, intimate, close and personal. Many are similar in tone and in their existential presuppositions and in their psychological analysis on the human condition. They’re not ever just ghost stories, or monster movies, or slashers. Under the guise of a genre film, these are windows into what defines us. Because of that, I love good horror films, and these ten are some of the best.

Let’s begin.

#10 Pieces of Talent
Sometimes a character comes long in film that is so mesmerizing and captivating, that you just can’t shake them. David is the cutest, cuddliest, and sweetest serial killer in horror film history. You just can’t help but love the guy. He’s Hannibal Lecter, but without the maudlin attitude. He’s The Dude of psychopaths. He just loves killin’ people and making movies about doing it. When he discovers Charlotte, he finds his muse, and David, with her as his starlet, will make his masterpiece.

Pieces of Talent is fascinating look at obsession and madness. It’s a crazy trip down the rabbit-hole. There’s rumors of a sequel’s in the works, from the same family that made this one. I’m not sure if David can get any more nuts, but it’ll be great watching him try.

Check out the trailer below and be sure to tune in tomorrow for #9.

The list so far.
#31 The Damned (2014)
#30 A Serbian Film (2010)
#29 The Inside (2012)
#28 Calvaire (2004)/Inbred (2012)
#27 Frankenstein’s Army (2013)
#26 Thale (2012)
#25 Bridgend (2013)
#24 The Grey (2011)
#23 Across The River (2013)
#22 The Pact (2011)
#21 Rec (2007)
#20 Baskin (2016)
#19 Let the Right One In (2008)
#18 Resolution (2013)
#17 I Saw the Devil (2010)
#16 Spring (2014)
#15 The Host (2006)
#14 Monsters (2010)
#13 Rubber Johnny (2013)
#12 The Triangle (2016)
#11 Under the Skin (2013)

Mark Goodchild
Creative Director

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Super honoured for our company to be featured in latest Business in Edmonton magazine.  Special thanks to the Edmonton Chamber of Commerce! #yeg #yegbiz #marketing

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Woohoo 🎉 So so proud, I know how hard you work you deserve it....Well Done.

Happy to share your unique story with the #YEG business community!

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super proud of you guys

Fantastic! You deserve it!🌟

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That's a shame - lol

We have 2 cancellations today, so we have 2 more spots to today’s CASTING WORKSHOP for actors. It’s a FREE workshop at Nordic Media, today at 3pm. 9719 - 47 Ave.This workshop will go over the casting process, etiquette, and best practices to help you get more roles.
Great day on set with this film. Amazing cast and crew!

Comment on Facebook

Can’t wait to see this - it was such a blast being part of this today. Thanks so much!

What a fantastic experience! Nordic Media runs an organized, professional & creative production...it was impressive to witness such an effective team at work!🌟

Brayden had a great time as well. It was very well run, organized and professional. We hope to work with you again soon and can’t wait to see the finished product!

Dylan Poyser had a great time on set! Can't wait to see the finished project.

===== CASTING CALL =====
*******TIME CHANGE*******
PRODUCTION: Video Commercial
BACKGROUND: The theme of the commercial: Dont drink and drive
PAID: Yes
AGENCIES: Yes
UNION: No
CASTING LOCATION: Edmonton
CASTING DATE: Wednesday, November 22, 2017
CASTING TIMES: 4pm - 7pm
PRODUCTION LOCATION: Edmonton
PRODUCTION DATE: TBA===== ROLE =====
Role: Male Lead for a commercial
Gender: Male
Age: 25-40===== SUBMISSIONS =====
Please Send:
1) Headshot and/or Links to any actor reels
*REQUIRED*2) A “CV” or “ACTORS RESUME”
(if you do not have an actors resume, put contact information including cell phone, email, and mailing address)
- If you can only make the audition at a certain time, please give us the time range (ie. “I can make the audition between 2pm and 4pm)3) Role(s) Applying For: Dont Drink and Drive - Male Lead
*REQUIRED*
Send the above to the following email address: casting@nordic.media===== QUESTIONS =====
If you have any questions, please visit our Facebook page www.facebook.com/gonordicmedia and submit a message to us.
LIKE us on Facebook / Twitter / Instagram for more upcoming casting calls and production info: Nordic Media @gonordicmedia

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ah darn, if only the times were later...I'm at work during audition time..oh well maybe next time!

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I'll help I hate drinking last night I had a beer in years and almost puked I hate and would be greatful to help

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